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MSCJ Source Code Coalition – Minnesota DWI Defense Lawyers Pool Resources to Discover and Analyze Source Code

September 1, 2009
Minnesota's Intoxilyzer 5000 Machine
Minnesota’s Intoxilyzer 5000 Machine

MSCJ Source Code Coalition

The Minnesota Society for Criminal Justice (mscj) has  led the way over the years in Minnesota Intoxilyzer 5000 computer source code discovery litigation, as have many of its individual members.  Now that Minnesota state and federal courts are ordering Minnesota and CMI to provide accused persons with meaningful access to the machine’s source code, MSCJ is again taking a leadership role by forming a coalition of MSCJ member defense attorneys and other Minnesota DWI defense attorneys (including those who are not members of MSCJ itself) to share the costs and the benefits of computer software and infrared breath-alcohol machine experts and their findings.

If you are a Minnesota DWI Defense Attorney seeking to become part of the coalition, please visit the  MSCJ Source Code Coalition page at www.mscj.org  to download an application.  Questions regarding Source Code Coalition membership may be directed to Lee Orwig at 952-224-4848 or lorwig@halbergdefense.com .

If you are a Judge or other person seeking to verify and identify Attorneys who are a member of the mscj source code coalition, and therefore who will have access to the Source Code Expert Work Product, please also visit the  MSCJ Source Code Coalition page at www.mscj.org  to see the most recent list.  (Coalition members listed on the Coalition page, infra, inlcude all lawyer members of the Minnesota Society for Criminal Justice (mscj) which are list at the mscj defense lawyer member directory page at www.mscj.org .)

Members of the MSCJ Source Code Coalition are entitled to the final report generated from the MSCJ team of experts’ analysis of the Intoxilyzer 5000EN source code.

Minnesota Intoxilyzer Source Code Developments Discussed August 8, 2009

August 8, 2009
mscj members hear Jeff Sheridan on source code discovery issues August 8, 2009

mscj members hear Jeff Sheridan on source code discovery issues on August 8, 2009

At the Saturday morning,  August 8, 2009 meeting of the Minnesota Society for Criminal Justice (mscj), the group discussed actions to be taken to secure and analyze the computer source code for Minnesota’s Intoxilyzer 5000 breath-alcohol machine. 

This was a major milestone, arrived upon due to success the hard fought in the court battles waged by mscj to force the State of Minnesota and the manufacturer of the machine CMI of Kentucky, to finally reveal their jealously guarded, secret source code.

For many years, the State of Minnesota has kept its breath-alcohol machine’s computer software secret – requiring people prosecuted by it to take their black box on blind faith and trust alone.  Now, thanks to years of litigation by mscj members, and mscj as an organization, a Federal Court Order out of Minnesota derived from a court-approved settlement, requires the State and CMI to give up the software to the lawyers and experts working for the people it is prosecuting based upon the machine’s reports.

 

Of course, it will take more time and more money to get the best experts for the job to go to Kentucky to analyze the machine’s source code, and discover its bugs and flaws.  Will Minnesota and CMI continue to obstruct access to the truth?

 

The Minnesota Society for Criminal Justice (mscj) has led the way in Minnesota on this issue for years, expending countless hours of volunteer, pro bono lawyer time, as well as tens of thousands of dollars.  The group intends to see it through, and uncover the truth about the machine, though doubtless the cost of this effort will more than equal the cost so far.

Lawyers and legal service sorganizations throughout Minnesota are contacting mscj for guidance, asking to help in the effort and share in the cost and in the results of the  source code defense expert investigation phase.
mscj members discuss source code investigation phase August 8, 2009

mscj members discuss source code investigation phase August 8, 2009